Saturday, September 18, 2010

Training courses for gems & jewellery sector

LAHORE (PR) - Pakistan Gems and Jewellery Development Company (PGJDC) has organized two training courses in Jewellery Pattern Making in Wax and Gemstone Identification and Grading at its Gems & Jewellery Training and Manufacturing Centre (GJTMC) in Lahore.
Both the courses started today would end on 20th March 2010. Twelve participants from the various fields of gems and jewellery sector of Pakistan have been enrolled for Jewellery Pattern Making in Wax training course while fifteen participants from the Gems & Jewellery industry of Pakistan will be trained in Gemstone Identification and Grading training course.
Jewellery Pattern Making in Wax is one of the most useful techniques of jewellery manufacturing. In this course the participants will be explained about making of jewellery in wax through various methods and techniques. Jewellery Pattern Making in Wax allows creation of jewellery prototypes which are either difficult or impossible to be manufactured directly from metal.
Gemstone Identification and Grading course help gemstone dealers in evaluating precious/semi-precious gemstones. The availability of Gemstone Identification Lab will help the participants to gain firsthand knowledge regarding the latest equipment. The participants will also be exposed to latest technology including modern equipments installed at the GJTMC in order to provide hands on experience to the participants.
Pakistan Gems and Jewelry Development Company (PGJDC) is the culmination of efforts put in by the Ministry of Industries, Production and Special Initiatives, Government of Pakistan and the stake holders of Gems and Jewelry sector in Pakistan. PGJDC is a public-private partnership to develop the value chain of gems and jewelry sector from mine to market. The company aims to enhance exports through facilitation, technology up-gradation, skills development and marketing/branding.

Sunday, August 29, 2010

Minerals and Gems from Earth

More than 4,000 naturally occurring minerals—inorganic solids that have a characteristic chemical composition and specific crystal structure—have been found on Earth. They are formed of simple molecules or individual elements arranged in repeating chains, sheets, or three-dimensional arrays.

Minerals are typically formed when molten rock, or magma, cools, or by separating out of mineral-rich water, such as that in underground caverns. In general, mineral particles are small, having formed within confined areas such as lava flows or between grains of sediments. Large crystals found in geodes and other rocks are relatively rare.

Rocks themselves are made of clusters or mixtures of minerals, and minerals and rocks affect landform development and form natural resources such as gold, tin, iron, marble, and granite.

Silicates—including quartz, mica, olivine, and precious minerals such as emeralds—are the most common class of minerals, as well as the major components of most rocks. Oxides, sulfides, sulfates, carbonates, and halides are other major mineral classes.

Many minerals form beautiful crystals, but the most prized of all are gemstones. Uncut gems are often fairly ordinary looking. It's only when they are cut and polished that they obtain the brilliance and luster that makes them so valued.

Historically gems have been divided into precious and semiprecious classes. There are a number of semiprecious gems, many quite beautiful, but diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and emeralds continue to qualify as "precious." (At one time, amethyst was also considered a precious gem, but large reserves were later found in Brazil, reducing its value.)

Diamonds, made of carbon atoms, are the hardest natural substance found on Earth. Formed under extremely high pressure hundreds of miles underground, they are found in very few locations around the world. Graphite is also made of carbon atoms, but with a different arrangement—explaining why diamond is the hardest mineral and graphite (used in pencil lead) is one of the softest.

Rubies are formed of a mineral called corundum, comprised of aluminum oxide. The red color is caused by traces of chromium. Corundum also forms sapphire in many colors, which generally come from trace mixtures of iron, titanium, and chromium.


Emeralds are formed of a mineral called beryl whose chemical formula is a complex mix of beryllium, aluminum, silicon, and oxygen. The color comes from additional traces of chromium and vanadium. Different trace elements can produce other colors, allowing beryl to form semiprecious stones such as aquamarine.


Minerals and gems are classified by their physical properties, including hardness, luster, color, density, and magnetism. They're also identified by the ways in which they break, or the type of mark, or streak, that they leave when rubbed on a laboratory tool called a streak plate.

Be Informed Before Buying Gemstones & Gemstone Jewelry

  • Find out how to determine whether you’re getting a good deal
  • Learn how to judge quality of gemstone jewelry by comparing pictures of different gemstones
  • Discover which gemstone is best for you by reading about gemstone meanings and symbology
  • Get unbiased information about the best places to purchase gemstones and gemstone jewelry.
You can read about gemstone meanings, gemstone symbology, learn how to determine quality of gemstones,  how to ensure you get value for your money and everything you’d need to know to be an informed buyer of gemstones.

This Blog do not sell gemstones or gemstone jewelry, nor are we affiliated with any seller, so you can be sure that the information is 100% unbiased. This Blog is here to empower people in the process of buying gemstones and gemstone jewelry.